Unix Fundamentals Course

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Course Description:

This is the first in a series of courses focusing on the Unix Operating System, including Linux, Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, etc. A comprehensive study is given, including its evolution, structure, programming environment, and user interface. Topics include user interfaces, the shell (Korn, Bourne, C, etc), file system commands, data manipulation commands, editors (vi and ed), software tools, networking tools, and system administration tools. Unix Essentials course is supplemented with many hands-on exercises that reinforce the lectures.

Who Should Attend:

This course is intended for programmers and end users that are new to the Unix operating system.

Benefits of Attendance:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the underlying philosophy of Unix
  • Login and log out of a Unix system
  • Navigate through the Unix file system
  • Use the productivity features of the Unix shell
  • Create and modify files using Unix editors
  • Copy, rename, and display files
  • Fluently use the Unix command set to solve standard computer related problems
  • Write simple shell scripts
  • Use job control features of the shell
  • Effectively use the Unix software tools
  • Perform backups and restores
  • Understand the responsibilities and the tools of the system administrator
  • Use awk and sed to solve system administration tasks
  • Use internetworking tools such as telnet and ftp

Prerequisites:

Students are required to have some familiarity with an operating system such s DOS or Windows.

Duration: 40 hours

Course Outline:

  • Chapter 1: Getting Started
  1. Introduction
  2. Features
  3. History
  4. Command Names
  5. Philosophy
  6. Characteristics
  7. Logging In and Logging Out
  8. Terminating a Session
  9. Parts of the Unix Operating System
  10. Functions of the Shell
  11. Shell as a Command Line Interpreter
  12. Command Characteristics
  13. Command Line Formats
  14. How to Get Help – man
  15. stty – Display Terminal Options
  • Chapter 2: Getting to Know the Shell
  1. The Shell as a User Interface
  2. The Standard Output File
  3. Redirection of the Standard Output File
  4. Appending to the Standard Output File
  5. Redirection of the Standard Input File
  6. Standard Input Examples
  7. Pipes
  8. The Standard Error File
  9. Standard Error Examples
  10. Special I/O Symbols Interpreted by the Shell
  11. Shell Variables
  12. Quoting Mechanisms
  13. Command Substitution
  14. The Shell Prompt Variables – PS1, PS2
  15. File Name Generation Characters
  16. Aliases
  17. Functions
  18. The History Mechanism
  19. Command Line Shortcuts
  • Chapter 3: The File System
  1. File System Picture
  2. User View of the File System
  3. File Types
  4. File System Concepts
  5. The /etc/passwd File
  6. Directory Commands
  7. File Access Permissions
  8. Groups
  9. The chmod Command
  10. Using chmod
  • Chapter 4: The vi Editor
  1. The ed Editor
  2. Sample ed Session
  3. Searching and Substituting with ed
  4. The vi Editor
  5. The vi Editor – Editing an Existing File
  6. The vi Editor – Adding Text
  7. Cursor Movement Commands
  8. Deleting Text
  9. Changing Text
  10. Copying and Moving Text
  11. Searching for Text
  12. Last Line Mode
  13. vi Customization
  14. Odds and Ends
  • Chapter 5: File Commands
  1. Relative vs. Complete Pathnames
  2. The Shell’s Search Algorithm
  3. ls Command
  4. cat Command
  5. cat Examples
  6. The rm Command
  7. mv Command
  8. cp Command
  9. ln Command
  10. ln Examples
  11. cmp and diff Commands
  12. Exit Codes
  13. Examples of Exit Codes
  14. file Command
  15. pg Command
  • Chapter 6: Commonly Used Commands
  1. grep – Print Lines Matching a Pattern
  2. grep Examples
  3. grep – Special Pattern Matching Characters
  4. grep – Other Considerations
  5. wc – The Word Count Command
  6. sort – Sort Lines of a File
  7. head(tail) – Display Beginning/End of a File
  8. tail – Display Last Few Lines
  9. tr – Translate Characters
  10. tr Options
  11. cut
  12. od – Octal Dump
  13. paste
  14. paste Examples
  15. split
  16. uniq
  17. lp Command
  • Chapter 7: Shell Programming
  1. Shells
  2. Scripting Rationale
  3. Creating a bash Script
  4. bash Startup Files
  5. A Script’s Environment
  6. Exporting Variables
  7. Exit Status
  8. Programming the Shell
  9. Parameter Passing
  10. Operators
  11. if
  12. Arithmetic
  13. Looping Constructs
  14. Input and Output
  15. Interrupts
  • Chapter 8: Job Control
  1. Processes
  2. Parent and Child Processes
  3. System Startup
  4. Shell Initialization
  5. Foreground vs. Background
  6. ps Command
  7. The kill Command
  8. Suspending Jobs
  9. jobs Command
  10. fg and bg Commands
  • Chapter 9: Software Tools
  1. C Language and UNIX
  2. Creating Programs in C
  3. Creating a Library
  4. Using the Library
  5. Static vs. Shared Libraries
  6. make
  7. Revision Control
  8. Concurrent Versioning System (CVS)
  9. Other Languages
  • Chapter 10: System Administration
  1. Duties of the System Administrator
  2. Bringing up the System
  3. Multi-User Mode
  4. Shutting Down the System
  5. Adding Users
  6. The /dev Directory
  7. The awk Language
  8. awk Scripts
  9. awk Odds and Ends
  10. The sed Command
  11. Special sed Characters
  12. The find Command
  13. Backing up Files
  14. cpio
  15. tar
  16. File System Commands
  17. The at Command
  18. The crontab Command
  • Chapter 11: Networking Applications
  1. TCP/IP
  2. Client/Server Model
  3. Ports
  4. DNS
  5. NFS
  6. ping
  7. ftp
  8. telnet
  9. ssh

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